Updates from Professionals

  • Litcaf - Remilekun Falade

    Remilekun Falade 4 weeks ago

    Hello everyone. We are on to LitCaf. The very big one.

  • Litcaf - Adedamola Abraham

    Adedamola Abraham 4 weeks ago

    Kids should not be encouraged to dump the sciences for anything. That is not hoe to grow an economy.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 1 month ago

    What caption for this? Surely a great shot.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 2 months ago

    This is how we do it. Happiness at work..Come try LitCaf

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 3 months ago

    What we do at #LitCaf #Coworking

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 3 months ago

    Not all about tech. Our use base is diverse array of gentle men and ladies. #LitCaf is where you want to be. #Coworking #Yaba #Lagos

  • Litcaf - Tope

    Tope 3 months ago

    Lets do this together, Otondo friends.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Dictionary definition of freelancer. How well do you agree with that?

  • Litcaf - Lovey Dovey

    Lovey Dovey 4 months ago

    Hello Everyone. Happy to be here on LitCaf

  • Litcaf - Apoola

    Apoola 4 months ago

    Idealized Biafra. Nothing shameful about that.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Good morning everyone. Wake up with a newer determination to achieve your objective.

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 4 months ago

    Still testing. One long test.

  • Litcaf - Apoola

    Apoola 4 months ago

    We got books to lend.

  • Litcaf -

    5 months ago

    Memory lane...Ken Saro Wiwa

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 5 months ago

    One innovation of ours.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 5 months ago

    May7ven was born in May 7. I thought that was obvious. However, that isn\'t what we are talking about now. Do you know that this website actually does not allow copy and paste because of its care about aesthetics?

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 5 months ago

    Me..Me..Me

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 5 months ago

    We research and present needed data to help with forecast, survey, and decision making. SND MiniMax Consultancy.

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 5 months ago

    Hello everyone. I like to introduce SND MiniMax Consultancy. We are involved in data collection and human capacity building.

  • Litcaf -

    5 months ago

    Hello, LitCaf. Seems very exciting, what\'s coming down here. Meanwhile, making a shout-out to best gal, May7.

Thomas Birch Freeman

(c) David Grice and the Trustees for Methodist Church Purposes; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
© David Grice and the Trustees for Methodist Church Purposes; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Thomas Birch Freeman was a Methodist minister and first preacher of the Christian gospel in Nigeria. Freeman was a mulatoo of black and English parentage, born in 1809 in Hampshire, England. He arrived in West Africa in 1838, a year after he was accepted as a Methodist missionary. At this time, some Saros who had become Christians in Sierra Leone and had made their way back to Abeokuta had asked the Wesleyan mission for help. From Badagry where he landed on Saturday 24 September, 1842, he made his sermons in the absence of a church, under the historic Agia Tree. Freeman left for Abeokuta at the written invitation of the Egba leader, Sodeke. In his memoir, Freeman writes, “I shall never forget the joy which beamed in their countenances as they seized me by the hand and bade me welcome.” He preached at Sodeke’s square and presented a copy of the Bible to him. He stayed ten days, and was released by his host, most reluctantly, for the work that awaits him in Badagry. Their departure was emotional. He spent the Christmas of the year with Henry Townsend, who just arrived, and who was bound for Abeokuta in the interests of the Church Missionary Society.

In 1854, Freeman again visited Abeokuta, meeting Shodeke’s successor, Somoye, who gave him a piece of land promised the decade before, for the purpose of building a Mission house. On his return home, he married and educated an African woman who bore him four children. His wife with whom he left England for Gold Coast had died years before. Finally, Freeman returned to Ghana, leaving the Methodist church in the hands of Williams De Graft, one of the first educated Ghanaians, who accompanied him to Badagry. His final days were spent in the Methodist Mission House in Accra where he often involved himself on the subject of botany. He became late on August 12, 1890.