Updates from Professionals

  • Litcaf - Remilekun Falade

    Remilekun Falade 2 months ago

    Hello everyone. We are on to LitCaf. The very big one.

  • Litcaf - Adedamola Abraham

    Adedamola Abraham 2 months ago

    Kids should not be encouraged to dump the sciences for anything. That is not hoe to grow an economy.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 2 months ago

    What caption for this? Surely a great shot.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 2 months ago

    This is how we do it. Happiness at work..Come try LitCaf

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    What we do at #LitCaf #Coworking

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Not all about tech. Our use base is diverse array of gentle men and ladies. #LitCaf is where you want to be. #Coworking #Yaba #Lagos

  • Litcaf - Tope

    Tope 4 months ago

    Lets do this together, Otondo friends.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Dictionary definition of freelancer. How well do you agree with that?

  • Litcaf - Lovey Dovey

    Lovey Dovey 4 months ago

    Hello Everyone. Happy to be here on LitCaf

  • Litcaf - Apoola

    Apoola 5 months ago

    Idealized Biafra. Nothing shameful about that.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 5 months ago

    Good morning everyone. Wake up with a newer determination to achieve your objective.

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 5 months ago

    Still testing. One long test.

  • Litcaf - Apoola

    Apoola 5 months ago

    We got books to lend.

  • Litcaf -

    6 months ago

    Memory lane...Ken Saro Wiwa

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 6 months ago

    One innovation of ours.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 6 months ago

    May7ven was born in May 7. I thought that was obvious. However, that isn\'t what we are talking about now. Do you know that this website actually does not allow copy and paste because of its care about aesthetics?

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 6 months ago

    Me..Me..Me

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 6 months ago

    We research and present needed data to help with forecast, survey, and decision making. SND MiniMax Consultancy.

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 6 months ago

    Hello everyone. I like to introduce SND MiniMax Consultancy. We are involved in data collection and human capacity building.

  • Litcaf -

    6 months ago

    Hello, LitCaf. Seems very exciting, what\'s coming down here. Meanwhile, making a shout-out to best gal, May7.

Victoria Davies

Victoria Davies goddaughter of Queen Victoria
Victoria Davies Source- Royal collection trust. Audio Media after first paragraph- Oloba by Coleridge Taylor Source- RND Taylor MLK 2012

Victoria Davies was the eldest daughter of Labulo Davies, a Lagos businessman and Sarah Forbes, goddaughter of the Queen Victoria of England. When Victoria Davies was born in 1863 she was named in honour of the Queen, who accepted to be her godmother, as she had been to her mother, Sarah. At her christening, Queen Victoria of England had given a lifelong allowance of forty pounds sterling and a solid gold christening-set. The Queen later invited her to Windsor. When she was four, the Queen recounts, she was far darker than her mother, and has big melancholy eyes. Like her mother, she showed considerable intelligence too. When Victoria Davies got married in 1890 to John Randle, a Scottish-trained medical doctor, there were two hundred guests, including Governor Moloney in a wedding at St, Paul’s Church in Lagos officiated by the reverend James Johnson. Her wedding gown was a careful selection of the Queen, passed with a special message with the “hope she’d consider it charming like her family did.”

 

 

Victoria Davies visited the Queen of England, together with her children, Beatrice and John in 1900, escorted by Bishop Johnson. Her marriage to John Randle did not last long; she lived with the children in the United Kingdom from 1898 and then Sierra Leone, returning to Lagos in 1917. In London, Davies had lodged in a hostel owned by the twin Semitic scholars, the Smith Sisters Adelaide, Nettie and Emm, that she introduced to Coleridge-Tayor, the prodigy who would rise to become one who chronicled a new day for the Negro in music. When Victoria came to Lagos she became a major face of the Ladies’ Club, an association of elite ladies in the city. She was mentioned by Coleridge-Tayor, the legendary English composer of Creole descent as source of the folklore song in his collection, Oloba yale mi. She died in 1920.