Kofoworola Aina Moore

Kofoworola Aina Moore

 

Kofoworola Aina Moore, educationist and children books author was known later in life as Lady Ademola, being wife of Adetokunbo Ademola, the first indigenous Chief Justice of Nigeria. Kofoworola was an early 20th Century symbol of educated elite, born 1914 to a lawyer father, Eric Moore, who was a member of the Colonial Legislative Council and who was trained in Middle Temple, London. Lady Ademola herself was taken to England at the age of 10 to school at C.M.S Girls’ School and Portway College in England. Thereafter, she became the first black African woman to enrol at Oxford University. After training as a teacher and having acquired other skills for a period of 11 years, she returned to Nigeria where she became a teacher at Queen’s College, Lagos. Later, she co-founded a school, and served as Headmistress to another. Kofoworola authored many childrens’ books. Her tales, usually punctuated with songs, focus on teaching basic moral lessons. Kofoworola also involved herself in gender activism and with the Red Cross, hence earning international acclaim. She was honoured in 1958 with the Member of Order of the British Empire and by Tafa Balewa’s government with the OFR. She became late in May 2002.

Kofoworola’s first-hand account of her experiences in Britain of the 1930s was published in Ten Africans, a 1936 collection edited by colonial expert, Margery Perham. There were no experiences of racism in Kofoworola’s account, except that her cleverness was to her irritation, often met with surprise.