Updates from Professionals

  • Litcaf - Remilekun Falade

    Remilekun Falade 4 weeks ago

    Hello everyone. We are on to LitCaf. The very big one.

  • Litcaf - Adedamola Abraham

    Adedamola Abraham 1 month ago

    Kids should not be encouraged to dump the sciences for anything. That is not hoe to grow an economy.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 1 month ago

    What caption for this? Surely a great shot.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 2 months ago

    This is how we do it. Happiness at work..Come try LitCaf

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    Temitope Jeremiah 3 months ago

    What we do at #LitCaf #Coworking

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    Temitope Jeremiah 3 months ago

    Not all about tech. Our use base is diverse array of gentle men and ladies. #LitCaf is where you want to be. #Coworking #Yaba #Lagos

  • Litcaf - Tope

    Tope 4 months ago

    Lets do this together, Otondo friends.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Dictionary definition of freelancer. How well do you agree with that?

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    Lovey Dovey 4 months ago

    Hello Everyone. Happy to be here on LitCaf

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    Apoola 4 months ago

    Idealized Biafra. Nothing shameful about that.

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    Temitope Jeremiah 4 months ago

    Good morning everyone. Wake up with a newer determination to achieve your objective.

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 4 months ago

    Still testing. One long test.

  • Litcaf - Apoola

    Apoola 4 months ago

    We got books to lend.

  • Litcaf -

    5 months ago

    Memory lane...Ken Saro Wiwa

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 5 months ago

    One innovation of ours.

  • Litcaf - Temitope Jeremiah

    Temitope Jeremiah 5 months ago

    May7ven was born in May 7. I thought that was obvious. However, that isn\'t what we are talking about now. Do you know that this website actually does not allow copy and paste because of its care about aesthetics?

  • Litcaf - Tope Apoola

    Tope Apoola 5 months ago

    Me..Me..Me

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 5 months ago

    We research and present needed data to help with forecast, survey, and decision making. SND MiniMax Consultancy.

  • Litcaf - MI Apoola

    MI Apoola 6 months ago

    Hello everyone. I like to introduce SND MiniMax Consultancy. We are involved in data collection and human capacity building.

  • Litcaf -

    6 months ago

    Hello, LitCaf. Seems very exciting, what\'s coming down here. Meanwhile, making a shout-out to best gal, May7.

Aguda

Amaro Afrobrazillian house in Lagos
An afrobrazillian house in Lagos, Source: JD Ojeikere

Aguda is the term used for Yoruba Brazilian returnees in 19th Century Lagos. Many of these people, also known as emancipados, or Amaros were captured from the interior in the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century and exported to Bahia in Brazil. The immigration of Amaros were concurrent with those of the Saros, Yorubas who came from Sierra Leone. Many Yorubas from the Americas took advantage of the favourable manumission laws in Brazil to emancipate themselves. Joined with emigrants from Cuba, the Amaros numbered up to 300 in 1862. They were originally Egba, Ijebu, Ibadan, Ife, or Oyo, repatriating to Lagos, from the first half of the 19th Century to an initially cold reception, and thereby preserving an insular life dominated by Brazilian occupational and cultural practices which they accustomed to. These cross-cultural returnees, possibly persuaded by the Oba of Lagos Akitoye‘s emissary to Brazil in the late 1840s, Oshodi Tapa, occupied on return, a district behind Oke Faji where the Church Missionary Society obtained a land from Akitoye. The place was called Brazilian town, sometimes, Popo Aguda (Portuguese Street) or Popo ‘Maro.

In 1871, Amaros numbered 1,273, a little lesser than the Saros. In the late 1800s and at the turn of the century, they built houses of bright pastel colours with balcony grills, dormers and attic spaces. The windows were large with a pointed gothic shape. The houses were ornate, sometimes garish but very well crafted. Unlike fellow Africans whose hair was usually cropped short, Aguda people of Lagos took great pride in parting their hair and wearing costly shoes, thereby imitating the civilization of the whites and the splendor of the Obas.